Female Trump supporters to women’s march organizers: ‘What’s the point?’

A day after Left-wing anarchists failed to do much of anything to #DisruptJ20 President Donald Trump’s inauguration, women from around

Trump

A day after Left-wing anarchists failed to do much of anything to #DisruptJ20 President Donald Trump’s inauguration, women from around the country streamed into the nation’s capital to march for…something.

To women who voted for the president and spent Friday night attending and enjoying various inaugural balls around Washington, D.C., the march on Saturday was not a little baffling to them, McClatchy Papers reported.

“I think it’s great, do your thing, but I just don’t know what they’re doing it for. They’re talking about rights, women’s rights, but what rights are being taken away from any women?” asked Susan Clarke, 50, who came to the capital from Charlotte, North Carolina, and wore a blue, bedazzled “Tar Heel Deplorable” shirt. “I don’t understand what the point is.”

Trump-supporting women were also a little indignant that one group would presume to speak for all women.

The protest, billed as the Women’s March on Washington, was expected to draw around 200,000 people on Saturday, who planned to march along the same route that Trump’s inaugural procession took on Friday. Similar marches were planned in hundreds of cities around the country and the world. (RELATED: What’s the new president prioritizing? Find out at Trump.news)

But at least 15 women McClatchy Papers interviewed said they weren’t keen on the title of the march.

“They can protest, it’s their right, but don’t call it the ‘Women’s March,’” 23-year-old Ellie Todd, who drove to the inauguration with a couple friends from Spartanburg, South Carolina, said. “That makes it sound like it’s a big unified thing, when really they’re picking very divisive issues and protesting against Trump—who by the way is now our president—instead of for something that would bring us all together. It’s not all women.”

Organizers have claimed that the march isn’t anti-Trump, but instead a ‘rallying cry’ for women’s issues and a host of Left-wing causes that they insist are going to be threatened under Trump’s administration.

According to the event’s policy platform, issues include racial profiling (by police), climate change, abortion and LGBTQ rights. The official web site lists 177 partners that include the Human Rights Campaign, NAACP Voto Latino and Planned Parenthood.

And while the platform statement includes language stating that anyone is welcome, no matter their beliefs or “political affiliation,” that was demonstrated to be a blatant lie—just like the ‘it’s not about Trump’ excuse.

Sheree Marre, 59, drove to the inauguration from Huntersville, North Carolina; she said she had friends who wanted to participate in the march but were told they couldn’t.

“They were pro-life, and apparently they weren’t allowing pro-life women to be part of the march,” she told McClatchy Papers. She added that the protest, by its very nature, implies that if you’re female, you can’t be a Trump supporter. (RELATED: Stay current with the Trump administration policy at Whitehouse.news)

Marre noted that she felt she was under some pressure to defend her support for Trump to other women after audio from 2005 of him talking about women in a crude manner surfaced during the campaign.

“We’re a forgiving country, and everybody makes mistakes,” she said. “I mean look at Nixon. Trump is human. But this day one, let’s give him a chance.”

The Left, however, is not in a forgiving mood, as is evidenced by the perpetual protesting that has taken place since Trump won the Nov. 8 election. In fact, as reported by The National Sentinel, perpetual protesting and criticism of Trump is going to be the Left’s modus operandi for at least the next four years.

Others interviewed by McClatchy said the women’s march was misguided and makes an assumption about Trump that does not ring true.

“I want to tell them, ‘Ladies – what are you doing?’” said Donna Lutz, 71, who traveled to the inauguration from Gainesville, Florida.

“Look at his beautiful daughters. Look at the woman he put in charge of his campaign, a woman that has done an extraordinary job,” she said, notiubg out that women who had worked with Trump for several years spoke well of him at the Republican National Convention.

“They said he was a great boss; we got paid the same,” she said.

J.D. Heyes is a senior writer for Natural News and News Target, as well as editor of The National Sentinel.

Sources:

McClatchyDC.com

TheNationalSentinel.com

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